Skip to Main Content

MKTG 200, 201, and 300: Companies

This guide provides resources for several marketing courses: MKTG 200: Introduction to Marketing; MKTG 201: Application in Marketing; and MKTG 300: Principles of Marketing.

Company Research: Strategies & Tips

  • Company website: company history, mission/vision/value statements (as available),10-K (for public companies) and annual reports (if available), other policy type documents (e.g., CSR/sustainability reports), media/news/press releases.
     
  • Company profiles in library resources: history, news, financial performance (if public), competitors, etc.
     
  • Private companies: information on private companies or subsidiaries can be harder to find than information on public companies. Search Reference Solutions, Mergent Intellect, and PrivCo for information on private companies.

Company Profiles & Directories

To find profiles and other information about a company, such as its history, product lines, customer base, key suppliers, management team, strategy, and competitors, use the following resources. Keep in mind that for public companies, additional information can be found in the company's 10-K, the annual report that all U.S. public companies have to file with the SEC.

SEC Filings

SECPublicly-traded companies must file financial statements with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the body that oversees all U.S. stock exchanges. The most useful is the 10-K, an official audited document that includes similar information from a prospectus or annual report, but provides additional updated financial information on corporate activities. Filings can be found at the SEC's Edgar Database.

Other commonly-sought filings include:

  • 10-Q: quarterly report
  • Proxy statements, including the DEF14-A
  • 8-K current event informational filings

These filings collectively are the source material for available financial statements and other factual data in our various subscription databases and many other free web company information sources.

Public companies & private companies: what's the difference?

Public companies have shares of stock or other registered securities that are bought and sold by the public on one of the stock exchanges. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) requires publicly traded companies to file extensive information with them, which is available online.

Private companies are not traded on any stock exhange. Generally, they do not have to file any documents with the SEC, so it can be more challenging to find information on them.

Company Websites

A company or organization website can be an excellent source of information for locations, products and services, pricing, and product specifications. For public companies, they can include the company's mission statement as well as links to annual reports and 10-K's.  SEC filings, especially 10-K reports, may include products, markets, distribution channels, research and development, patent, and environmental safety information.

Note: Websites are not objective information sources, do not depend on them to tell the entire story about a company or organization.