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Chicago/Turabian Citation Style: Citing Books

This is a guide on how to use the Chicago Manual of Style/Turabian citation style. It provides examples of basic formats for sources using Chicago style.

Basic Print Book Styles

Here are examples of basic formats for sources (second and subsequent lines are indented).  Include as much information as you are able to locate from the resource. In the bibliography, the first author's last name is listed first.  Resources are listed alphabetically by first author's last name  For anonymous works, the citation is inserted into the alphabetical list using the first word(s) of the title:

Format:

Author(s). Title. Place of publication: Publisher, Date.

Single author: 

Doe, John. Writing Styles. New York: Doe Publishers, 1999.

Two or more:

Doe, John, and Thomas Smith and Richard Jones.  Writing Techniques.  
         New York:  Doe Publishers, 2001.

No author listed:

Electronic Reference Formats in the Community.  NewYork:  Doe Publishers, 
         2002.

Secondary Sources

Only cite secondary sources when you are unable to obtain the original. When you are quoting or paraphrasing information by someone who was quoted in a secondary source, and you have not read the original, you should cite the original source either as a footnote/endnote, or within the text, and then cite the secondary source in the reference list.  You should attempt to find and read the original work, if possible. 

Format:

Original Article cited in a Text (Footnote or Endnote):

          1Author, "Article Title," Journal Title Volume # (Date): Page,
quoted in Author, Title (Place of Publication: Publisher, Date), Page.

 

Original Book cited in a Text (Footnote or Endnote):

          1Author, Book Title, Place of Publication: Publisher, Date, Page,
quoted in Author, Title (Place of Publication: Publisher, Date), Page.

 

Citing Original Work within the text of your paper and Citing Secondary Text in Reference List:

Citing in Text:

...as noted in Author's "Article Title," from the Date issue of Journal Title (quoted in Author Date)...    

Entry in Reference List:

Author. Title. Place of publication: Publisher, Date.

Examples:

Original Article cited in a Text (Footnote or Endnote):

        1Dowden, Edward, "Middlemarch and Daniel Deronda," Contemporary
Review
29 (1877) 348-69, quoted in Fleishman, Avrom, George Eliot's
Intellectual Life
 (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2010), 193. 

Citing Original Work within the text of your paper and Citing Secondary Text in Reference List:

        1Wolff, Michael, Marian Evans to George Eliot: The Moral and Intellectual
Foundations of Her Career,  Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, 1958, 28,
quoted in Fleishman, Avrom, George Eliot's Intellectual Life (Cambridge, UK:
Cambridge University Press, 2010), 64. 

Citing Original Work within the text of your paper and Citing Secondary Text in Reference List:

               Citing in Text:

               ...as noted in Wolff's unpublished dissertation,  Marian Evans to George

               Eliot: The Moral and Intellectual Foundations of Her Career (quoted in

               Fleishman 2010)...

               Entry in Reference List:

                      Fleishman, Avrom. George Eliot's Intellectual Life. Cambridge, UK: 
               Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Other Examples

Book chapters or anthologies:

Format:    

Aurthor(s). "Chapter Title." in Book Title. editor(s). Page numbers. 
         Place of Publication: Publisher, Publication date.

Example:

Smith, Thomas.  "How to Write."  in Writing With Style and
         Technique.  edited by Richard Jones. 15-22. New York: Doe
         Publishers, 2000.

Electronic Only Books:

 

Dissertations & Theses

Below is the basic format for citing dissertations and theses in Chicago citation style.

Format:

Author. "Dissertation Title." PhD diss., Institution Name,
       Date of Publication. 

Example:

Threinen, Noni. "Ways of Learning and Leadership: Midlife 
      Women in Communities of Practice." PhD diss., University 
      of St. Thomas, 2009.

Dictionaries and Encyclopedias

Dictionaries and Encyclopedias:

Whether online or in print, general encyclopedias (e.g. Encyclopaedia Britannica, Webster's Dictionary, Wikipedia, etc.) are rarely cited in the bibliographies.  They should be cited in notes.  Those reference works which include substantial research articles that indicate the authors, should be cited in the bibliography.  The examples below are for those resources cited in the bibliography. For more information on how to cite general works in the notes, see sections 14.247 (print resources) and 14.248 (online resources) in the Chicago Manual of Style Online or check the Dictionaries and Encyclopedias box on the Notes page of this guide.

Print Encyclopedias:

 Hill, Charles G. "Gide, Andre."  In Encyclopedia of World 
         Literature in the 20th Century 
 Farmington Hills, MI: 
         St. James Press, 1999.

Online Encyclopedias:

   Vietto, Angela. "Burnett, Frances Hodgson." In Continuum 
         
Encyclopedia of American Literature. Credo Reference. 2005. 
         
Accessed January 20, 2012.  https://login.ezproxy.stthomas.edu/login?qurl=
         http%3A%2F%2Fwww.credoreference.com/entry/amlit/
         burnett_frances_hodgson
.