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APA Citation Style 6th ed.: Citing Articles

This is a guide on how to use the American Psychological Association citation style. It provides examples of basic formats for sources using APA Style.

Peer-reviewed journal articles using APA

Peer-reviewed journal articles are cited in the same way as non-peer-reviewed articles.  Just be sure to identify between journals which use continuous paging for issues from those that repeat paging in each issue.

See examples in the box below:

Journal Articles

For multiple authors, see the Books section for examples. For more examples, check out section 7.01 in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.

Print articles with Continuous paging (if each issue in a volume continues the paging where the previous issue left off), do not include issue number:
 

Format:  

Author(s). (Year of publication). Article title. Journal title,
 

      Volume #, Page numbers.
 

Example:

Jones, J. (2003). Writing without style. Writing Journal,
 

      22, 99-106.
 

Print articles with Paging repeated (if each issue in a volume starts numbering pages from page one), include the issue number:
 

Format:

Author(s). (Year of publication). Article title. Journal title,
 

      Volume #(Issue #), Page numbers.
 

Example:

Jones, J. (1999). Writing with style.  Style Writing Journal,
 

      12(6), 14-33.
 

Online full-text journal article citation when DOI is indicated
 

Format:

Author(s). (Year of publication). Article title. Journal title,
 

      Volume number (Issue number), Page numbers. DOI
 

Example:

Jones, J.T. (2001). How writing influences our lives. Style
 

      Writing Journal, 14(6), 112-135. doi:12.3X445.678.9101
 


Online full-text journal article when DOI is not indicated (use home page URL for publication):
 

Example:

Johnson, R.N. (2001). What writing style does for me. Style
 

      Writing Journal, 14(6), 92-101. Retrieved from
 

      http://www.stylewrjnl.com/index

 

Finding DOIs and other issues

Need help with APA Style? We're here for you! Always feel free to email or set up an appointment.

Other questions

Check out Merrie Davidson's Blog for answers to the following questions:

Secondary Sources

When you are quoting or paraphrasing information by someone who was quoted in a secondary source, and you have not read the original, you should cite the original source within the text, and then cite the secondary source in the reference list.  You should attempt to find and read the original work, if possible.  Only cite secondary sources when you are unable to obtain the original.

Citing original work within text:
 

Example:

   ...as noted by Virginia Chou (as cited in Appiah, 2010)...
 

Citing secondary source in reference list:
 

Example:

   Appiah, K.W. (2010). The Honor Code: How moral revolutions |
 

         happen. New York, NY: W.W. Norton.

Magazine Articles

Magazine articles are similar to Journal articles when citing.
 

Format:

Author(s). (Year of publication). Article title. Journal title,
 

      Volume # (Issues #), Page numbers.
 

Example:

Kluger, Jeffrey. (2010). Keeping young minds healthy.
 

      Time, 176 (18), 40-50.

Newspaper Articles

For more details, go to Page 200 in the paperback edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.
 

Print Newspaper Articles:
 

Format:

Author(s). (Full date). Title of Article. Name of Newspaper.
 

      Page #'s.
 

Example:

Blake, L. (2010, July 6). The great (sheltered) outdoors small, basic cabins

        built by prison inmates keep people camping after tents have lost their

        allure. Star Tribune. p. A1.
 

Online Newspaper Articles:
 

Format:

Author(s). (Full date). Title of Article. Name of Newspaper.
 

      Retrieved from URL of Newspaper home page.
 

Example:

Blake, L. (2010, July 6). The great (sheltered) outdoors; small, basic cabins

        built by prison inmates keep people camping after tents have lost their

        allure. Star Tribune. Retrieved from http://www.startribune.com/ 

Encyclopedia articles

Encyclopedia Article:

   Print Encyclopedia:

      Format:

            Author(s). (Date). Title of chapter or entry. In Editor(s),
 

                  Title of book (Page numbers). Place of publication: Publisher.
 

      Example:

             Waas, G.A. & Kleckler, D.M. (2000). Play Therapy. In A.E. Kazdin
 

                  (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Psychology (Vol. 6, pp 218-222). Washington,|
 

                  D.C.: American Psychological Association.
 

   Online Encyclopedia:

      Format:

            Author(s). (Date). Title of chapter or entry. In Editor(s).
 

                  Title of book (page numbers). Retrieved from URL
 

      Example:

            Crane, S.C.M. (2008). Play Therapy. In Frederick T. L. Leong,
 

                  Elizabeth M. Altmaier, and Brian D. Johnson (Eds.), Encyclopedia
 

                  of Counseling: Vol. 1: Changes and Challenges for Counseling in the
 

                  21st Century (pp. 331-334). Retrieved from
 

                  http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%

                  7CCX3074200119&v=2.1&u=clic_stthomas&it=r&p=GVRL&sw=w
 

"Refereed" or "Peer-Reviewed Journals Information

"Peer review" is the process through which experts in a field of study examine and assess the quality of articles before they are published.  Peer review insures that the research described in a journal's articles is sound and of high quality.

Sometimes the term "refereed" is used instead of peer reviewed.

You can identify Peer reviewed journals in the following source: